Justin Regan

Reporter

Justin is a graduate of NAU and is originally from the great state of California. He came to KNAU in the winter of 2013 as a news intern, and then a part time reporter in the fall of that year. Justin also was a reporter for NAU’s campus newspaper, The Lumberjack for three and a half years, and continues to play on the school’s Quidditch team. Justin’s favorite part of radio reporting is the emotion that can be conveyed in audio that just can’t be done in print.

Ways to Connect

Justin Regan

A research team at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott has received a first of its kind grant to test building materials against weapons. The goal is to see what works best for delaying an active school shooter. As KNAU’s Justin Regan reports, it’s a more passive style of security that uses the architecture itself as a barrier.


Justin Regan

Students across the country staged walkouts today to honor the victims of the Parkland, Florida shooting and to call for safer schools and gun reform. KNAU’s Justin Regan spoke with some kids at Flagstaff High School.


Deirdre Cronin

Arizona teachers are protesting some of the lowest pay in the nation. Some marched on the capitol and many others are wearing red as a sign of solidarity. KNAU’s Justin Regan reports.


Teenagers across the country have become activists in the wake of last month’s shooting at a high school in Parkland Florida. They’ve marched on Washington and their state capitols, met with politicians and held walkouts demanding gun reform and better school safety. They’re using social media platforms to organize more protests and discuss the idea of arming teachers. KNAU’s Justin Regan and Gillian Ferris interviewed some students at Coconino High School in Flagstaff to see what they think about school gun violence in the U.S. post-Parkland. 


Foundry Treatment Center

Parkland Florida is the scene of the latest mass school shooting in the U.S. Hundreds of students and their families have been affected. These shootings have a ripple effect in a community that reaches far and wide. Austin Eubanks knows about that. He survived the Columbine shooting almost 20 years ago and has experienced first-hand that kind of trauma. For Eubanks it manifested in the form of more than a decade of substance abuse. Now sober, and helping others in recovery, he spoke with KNAU’s Justin Regan about the invisible injuries of a mass shooting and the connection between trauma and addiction.


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