Gillian Ferris

Managing Editor

Gillian came to KNAU in 2001 as a freelance reporter. Her first story won an Arizona Associated Press Award. Since then, Gillian has won more than a dozen Edward R. Murrow Awards for feature reporting, writing and documentary work. She served as the local anchor for NPR’s Morning Edition for 8 years before moving into a full time reporting position in 2012. Gillian covers everything from environmental issues to sports, with a penchant for human interest stories of all kinds. When she’s not working, Gillian revels in the natural world and is an avid hiker, skier, swimmer, river runner and surfer. She also enjoys making fancy cakes and reorganizing her collection of fabulous shoes… 70 pairs and counting.

Ways to Connect

Two Sedona men pled guilty this week in Federal Magistrate Court to criminal violations connected to unauthorized trail construction on the Coconino National Forest. Arizona Public Radio's  Gillian Ferris Kohl reports.

KNAU

As if Friday weren't reason enough to celebrate, today is also the official start of Arizona Beer Week. It's a week-long showcase of Arizona's growing craft beer industry, with events across the state. Arizona Public Radio's Gillian Ferris Kohl reports on Flagstaff's presence in this burgeoning field.

KNAU/Gillian Ferris Kohl

Arizona May not be the first place that comes to mind when you think of skiing. But, it actually holds a unique place in skiing history. The Arizona Snowbowl, near Flagstaff, is one of the longest continually running ski resorts in the West. This month marks it's 75th anniversary. And Arizona Public Radio's Gillian Ferris Kohl looks back at a history filled with innovation, adventure...and controversy.

Lee Born

Northern Arizona has finally come out of a cold snap that set record-breaking lows for both day and nighttime temperatures. Arizona Public Radio's Gillian Ferris Kohl spoke with Flagstaff meteorologist Lee Born about the big freeze.

Protests continue over Arizona Snowbowl's use of reclaimed wastewater for artificial snowmaking.

Rob Capriccioso / Native Village Youth and Education News

Representatives from every recognized American Indian tribe in the nation gathered last week in Washington, D.C. for the White House Tribal Nations Conference.

SearchNet Media from Tucson, Arizona

The National League of Cities has chosen to recognize Flagstaff for its achievements in climate and weather preparedness.  The city is the first in the country to adopt a climate event policy for all municipal operations.

Chris Coe

An eligibility assessment conducted by the National Park Service has concluded that almost 97 percent of Wupatki National Monument, north of Flagstaff, is eligible for a formal wilderness study. The 1964 Wilderness Act and 2006 NPS Management Policies require that all areas managed by the National Park Service are reviewed to determine if they meet criteria for wilderness designation. President Calvin Coolidge established the Monument in 1924 to protect the abundant prehistoric archaeological sites in the area, which span at least ten thousand years.

Circus Bacchus

The Hula Hoop is on fire…literally. The popularity of Hooping” has soared in recent years, transforming it from a groovy toy in the 1960’s to pyrotechnic performance art in the two thousands.

Flagstaff geologist Wayne Ranney discusses some new theories of how - and when - the Grand Canyon formed. The second edition of Ranney's book, Carving Grand Canyon, was recently released.

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