Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Two journalists and three former Vatican officials have been formally charged with "criminal misappropriation" and other crimes, the Vatican says, in a case tied to allegations of financial misdeeds by Catholic Church officials.

Those arrested include Spanish Monsignor Lucio Vallejo Balda and Francesca Immacolata Chaouqui, who served on a special Vatican commission on economic reform that was assembled by Pope Francis shortly after he was elected in 2013.

Turkish police have arrested a Belgian man of Moroccan origin who is suspected of being an ISIS operative who scouted the sites that were attacked in Paris last week. Ahmet Dahmani, 26, was arrested at a luxury hotel; two Syrian men were also arrested nearby.

Dahmani had reportedly been under surveillance since he flew on an airline to the seaside resort of Antalya – the same town that, just last weekend, hosted President Obama and other world leaders at the G-20 summit.

One week after a deadly terrorist attack hit Paris, Belgium has raised its terror alert in the Brussels region to the highest level, with Prime Minister Charles Michel saying, "We have concrete information that a similar attack like in Paris could take place in Brussels."

One of the most popular books in France this week is a classic: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway. Its title in French is Paris est une fete — or "Paris is a party." The book is finding new readers — and it's also being left as a tribute to those who lost their lives one week ago.

The Hemingway memoir, published posthumously in 1964, is being celebrated for what it, in turn, celebrates: Paris as an exciting place of ideas, a nexus of people who love life and the arts. The book is set in the 1920s, as Paris recovered from the oppressions of World War I.

After spending 30 years in prison for spying on the U.S. for Israel, Jonathan Pollard was released Friday. His attorney confirmed Friday morning that Pollard has been released, shortly after Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a statement welcoming his release.

Updated 9:55 p.m. ET: American Victim Identified

The family of Anita Datar, an international development worker, has confirmed she was the American who died in Friday's terrorist attack on a hotel in Bamako, the capital of Mali.

The U.S. State Department released this statement on the family's behalf:

Days after announcing that America's Test Kitchen co-founder Chris Kimball had left the company over a contract dispute, the enterprise's parent company says Kimball will continue to host America's Test Kitchen Radio, which is also a podcast.

U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt sentenced former Subway pitchman Jared Fogle to a prison term of more than 15 years Thursday, accepting a plea deal that sees him admit to charges of receiving child pornography and repeatedly having sex with minors.

The case involved interstate travel to pay minors for sex, as well as at least 400 child pornography videos — many of which Fogle received from the head of his charity, prosecutors said at today's hearing.

When the French nuclear aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle reaches its position near Syria's coast, it will find what until recently might have seemed an unlikely ally: a Russian guided missile cruiser. A U.S. official says Russia is newly receptive to cooperation in Syria.

Eight months after Ferguson's city manager resigned in the wake of a scathing Justice Department report, which found recurrent problems in the city's legal system, Ferguson officials have named a replacement.