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It's All Politics
7:10 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Debate Does Nothing To Derail Romney's 'Kudzu Campaign'

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney maintained his frontrunner status in the GOP presidential debate at Dartmouth College on Tuesday.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 1:23 pm

Mitt Romney continued his dogged, incremental pursuit of the White House, dominating the GOP presidential debate on the economy Tuesday night. The man once touted as his most formidable opponent was barely a factor.

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The Two-Way
7:09 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Israel, Hamas Prisoner-Swap Deal: The Ripple Effects

What does the deal reached by Israel and Hamas to exchange long-held Sgt. Gilad Schalit for about 1,000 Palestinian prisoners mean for the seemingly never-ending Mideast peace process and politics in the region?

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Wed October 12, 2011

BlackBerry Outages Continue, Reports Say They've Spread To North America

Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 2:14 pm

The focus remains on "Europe, the Middle East, Africa and India," where millions of BlackBerry users are without text services for a third straight day, Reuters reports, but there's word now that the problems are also affecting folks in North America.

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The Two-Way
4:59 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Top Stories: Terror Plot, Baghdad Bombings, Republican Debate

Good morning.

Our early headline today was a follow to the news about an alleged plan by two Iranians to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S.:

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

As for other stories making headlines (and we'll have more about some of them later), they include:

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The Two-Way
4:30 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

This courtroom drawing shows Manssor Arbabsiar (front, right), appearing before U.S. Southern District Court Judge Michael H. Dolinger on Tuesday.

Shirley Shepard AFP/Getty Images

Two words — brazen and bizarre — come to mind about the alleged plot by two Iranians to hire members of a Mexican drug cartel to kill the Saudi ambassador to the U.S. and possibly bomb the Saudi and Israeli embassies in Washington, NPR's Tom Gjelten said earlier today on Morning Edition.

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Africa
11:32 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Famine-Stricken Somalia Suffers From Aid Drought

Humanitarian groups are increasingly worried about the looming budget cuts in U.S. foreign assistance. They argue that lives are at stake, literally, in places like the Horn of Africa, which is suffering its worst drought in decades.

Raising public and private money for that has been a challenge in the current economic environment.

Hollywood stars and politicians have resorted to using the F word — in this case Famine — to get the attention of Americans about the humanitarian emergency in Somalia.

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
9:01 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Immigrant Parents Rely On Kids For Help Online

A pamphlet in Spanish for Cingular phone rate information is displayed in a Cingular store in Elmhurst, Illinois. Cingular announced in 2006 that it was converting 420 of their stores to "a bilingual concept," with both English and Spanish phone information, payment options and bilingual staff members.

Tim Boyle Getty Images

On a weekend in East L.A., kids do what they do anywhere else — play games, hang out in restaurants. But in this immigrant neighborhood, many of them have grown-up responsibilities. Fifteen-year-old Gonzalo Cruz says his parents depend on him for help online.

"When they need to look up a place, like a doctor's appointment, I show them," Cruz says. "Computers right now, in our country, they're just English. You have to use them a certain way, and they didn't learn to do that when they were little."

Thirteen year-old Cassandra Flores helps her parents pay bills online.

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Research News
9:01 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Pain At The Plate: Heat Increases Pitcher Retaliation

Adrian Beltre of the Texas Rangers is hit by a pitch from the Tampa Bay Rays' James Shields on Oct. 1 at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas.

Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 11:54 am

Richard Larrick has been bothered by something for two decades.

"Twenty years ago, I'd done a paper with some graduate students just showing that in hotter temperatures, pitchers are more likely to hit batters with pitches," says Larrick, a professor at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.

Was it because they would sweat more, and the ball might get slippery and hard to control? Or was it something intentional?

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Law
9:01 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Should Minor Offenders Be Subject To Strip Searches?

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments for a case testing whether prison guards may constitutionally strip search even minor traffic offenders when they are arrested and taken to jail.

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 2:14 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case testing whether prison guards may constitutionally strip-search even minor traffic offenders when they are arrested and taken to jail.

For decades, most courts did not allow such blanket strip searches, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way.

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