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Law
4:20 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Justices Limit State Liability Under Medical Leave Act

Daniel Coleman outside the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments in his case in January. On Tuesday, the justices ruled against Coleman, holding that that states cannot be sued for money damages for failing to give an employee time off to recover from an illness under the Family and Medical Leave Act.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 5:18 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that states cannot be sued for money damages for failing to give an employee time off under the Family and Medical Leave Act to recover from an illness. The vote was 5 to 4 with no legal theory commanding a clear majority.

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It's All Politics
3:54 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Illinois: Live Blog And Results

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and his wife, Ann Romney, celebrate his victory in the Illinois GOP primary at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel in Schaumburg, Ill.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:56 am

With a decisive victory in Illinois, Mitt Romney is firmly in the driver's seat of the Republican presidential nomination contest.

In a victory speech in Schaumburg, Ill., the former Massachusetts governor thanked his Republican opponents, but very quickly pivoted to the general election against President Obama.

"It's time to say this word," said Romney. "Enough. We've had enough... We need a president who believes in us."

This Romney speech even sounded different. With Romney restating the big ideals of his campaign, it sounded like an acceptance speech.

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Law
3:14 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Supreme Court Considers Life Sentences For Juveniles

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Tuesday in two cases that ask whether it is constitutional to sentence juveniles to life in prison without parole.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in two murder cases testing whether it is unconstitutionally cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 14-year-old to life in prison without the possibility of parole. There are currently 79 people serving such life terms for crimes committed when they were 14 or younger.

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The Salt
2:44 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

At The Community Garden, It's Community That's The Hard Part

One of the community gardens divided up into individual plots run by Denver Urb Gardens.
Courtesy of Denver Urb Gardens

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 8:20 am

You may think that the great historic debate between communism and private property is over.

Well, it's not. Not at your local community garden.

Take, for example, the experience of Campos Community Garden in Manhattan's East Village.

Eight years ago, the garden was decrepit and abandoned. Beverly McClain walked by it all the time, on the way to her daughter's school. And one day, she and a motley group of fellow gardeners decided to revive it.

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Author Interviews
2:16 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

'Shoah' Director Details Memoirs In 'Patagonian Hare'

Claude Lanzmann published his memoir, Le Lièvre de Patagonie, in France in 2009. The Patagonian Hare has now been translated into English.
Helie Gallimar Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Seventy years ago, in the middle of World War II, a couple of hundred miles north of Toulouse, Claude Lanzmann was a high school student — and an assimilated French Jew. Every day he faced the risk of arrest.

When Lanzmann was a teenager, both he and his father independently joined the Communist Resistance. He writes about that in his newly translated memoir, The Patagonian Hare.

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Opinion
2:06 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Trayvon Martin: The Lingering Memory Of Dead Boys

Attorney Benjamin Crump speaks to the medial, holding cellphone records and a police report. He represents the family of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, who was was killed by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 4:05 pm

Tayari Jones has written for McSweeney's, The New York Times and The Believer. Her most recent book is Silver Sparrow.

Like many Americans, I have been glued to the television eager for details about the tragic murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. I am not sure what I hoped to discover, as each new piece of evidence is more disturbing than the last.

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The Two-Way
1:59 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Southern Miss Revokes Scholarships Of Band Members For 'Green Card' Chant

The University of Southern Mississippi announced that it took disciplinary action against five of its pep band members today.

The five students were involved in one of the more controversial moments of the NCAA tournament, when they chanted "Where's your green card?" as Angel Rodriguez, a Latino player from Kansas State, took a free throw.

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It's All Politics
1:48 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Robert DeNiro's Racial First-Lady Joke Was An Obama No-No

Actor Robert De Niro with his wife, Grace Hightower, in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 4, 2011.
Michael Tran Getty Images

Maybe Robert De Niro didn't know. Or maybe he forgot.

But when the superstar actor joked at a New York Obama campaign fundraiser Monday evening which Michelle Obama attended about the country not being ready for a white first lady, he got into dangerous territory for President Obama.

According to an Obama campaign pool report, De Niro deadpanned:

"Callista Gingrich. Karen Santorum. Ann Romney. Now do you really think our country is ready for a white first lady?"

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Sports
1:48 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

The Rodeo Circuit: Bucking Bulls And Broken Bones

Two bullfighters are tossed by the bull Jumpin Jack Flash during the 2006 Professional Bull Riders World Finals in Las Vegas.
Donald Miralle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:56 am

It's spring, and that means rodeo season is ramping up, especially in the American West. Some professional cowboys will soon be competing almost every night in bull riding, calf roping or steer wrestling.

But along with the trophy buckles and cash prizes, cowboys also bring home injuries — some of them severe. Some rodeo events are more dangerous, and less lucrative, than football and other contact sports.

An Unsteady Paycheck

The 2012 Houston Rodeo begins with a prayer and the national anthem, followed by the first event: calf roping.

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Middle East
1:43 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Turkey Resists Calls To Arm Syrian Rebels

Syrians living in Turkey and human-rights activists stage a protest on Feb. 4 outside the Syrian consulate in Istanbul to condemn the killings in Syria. Calls are growing louder for Turkey to intervene in the violence in neighboring Syria by helping the rebels and civilians there.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 3:15 pm

The rising civilian death toll in Syria is accompanied by mounting calls to arm the Syrian opposition. And Turkey, a NATO country that shares a long, rugged border with Syria, is often mentioned as a likely transit point.

Turkey has become increasingly critical of the Syrian regime, but Ankara is thus far reluctant to send significant arms across the border or use its large military to create a humanitarian corridor inside Syria.

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