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Parallels
3:42 am
Tue August 4, 2015

Berlin's New Airport: Still In A Holding Pattern

The Willy Brandt Berlin Brandenburg International Airport was supposed to open in 2012, but has been delayed repeatedly and is now set to open in 2017. The cost overruns and delays have made airport the butt of frequent jokes.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 5:19 am

Germany may be Europe's economic giant, but Berlin remains the lone major European capital without a proper airport. The mismanaged, roughly $6-billion project to build one became a national laughing stock that has dragged on for years.

Ground was broken on the airport in 2006 and the opening was delayed just shortly before the planned date in 2012. The airport's managers are now pledging that Germany's third-largest airport will open on the outskirts of Berlin before the end of 2017.

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The Salt
3:42 am
Tue August 4, 2015

Here's The Buzz On America's Forgotten Native 'Tea' Plant

Yaupon growing in the wild in east Texas. This evergreen holly was once valuable to Native American tribes in the southeastern U.S., which made a brew from its caffeinated leaves.
Murray Carpenter for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 5:19 am

During a severe drought in 2011, JennaDee Detro noticed that many trees on the family cattle ranch in Cat Spring, Texas, withered, but a certain evergreen holly appeared vigorous. It's called a yaupon.

"The best we can tell is that they enjoy suffering," Detro says with a laugh. "So this kind of extreme weather in Texas — and the extreme soil conditions — are perfect for the yaupon."

Detro began researching yaupon — a tree abundant in its native range, from coastal North Carolina to East Texas — and discovered that the plant contains caffeine and has a remarkable history.

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Shots - Health News
2:03 am
Tue August 4, 2015

Is Obamacare's Research Institute Worth The Billions?

PCORI Executive Director Joe Selby says grants to medical societies are needed to get through to busy professionals who "may not answer our phone calls."
Stephen Elliot Courtesy of PCORI

On the ninth floor of a glassy high rise in downtown Washington, partitions are coming down to make more room for workers handing out billions of dollars in Obamacare-funded research awards.

Business has been brisk at the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute or, PCORI, as it is known. The institute was created by Congress under the Affordable Care Act to figure out which medical treatments work best —measures largely AWOL from the nation's health care delivery system.

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Delta And American Ban Big Game Trophies As Airline Freight

The death of Cecil the lion, lured out of a protected area in Zimbabwe, has led Delta Airlines to stop shipping big-game trophies.
Andy Loveridge AP

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 10:27 pm

Updated at 1:30am ET

Delta says it will no longer allow freight shipments of big game trophies. The decision follows the killing of a popular lion in Zimbabwe.

The airline said in a statement on Monday that, effective immediately, it "will officially ban shipment of all lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros, and buffalo trophies."

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NPR Story
3:32 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

From The Eye Of The Hurricane To Near Oblivion: Katrina's Forgotten Town

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Pearlington, Miss., a tiny town on the border with Louisiana. A home currently under construction there adheres to new FEMA standards for elevation.
David Schaper NPR

When Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast 10 years ago, the eye of the storm made landfall near a tiny speck of a town at the mouth of the Pearl River on the Louisiana border with Mississippi.

To say Katrina — one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history — nearly wiped Pearlington, Miss., off the map isn't entirely true. The fact is, Pearlington was so small that it wasn't even on many maps.

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The Salt
2:54 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

Not only did the family trade their urban life for one in a beautiful valley surrounded by mountains and trees, but they also earn $300,000 a year.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 9:10 pm

Kim Pil-Gi left his construction job in Seoul, South Korea, three months ago. Now he happily spends his days handling grubs: squirming, writhing, beetle larvae, each one about as thick as a grown man's thumb. He sits at a tray, sorting them by size.

"At the construction company a lot of the time I'd wake up at 6 in the morning and work all night through to the next day," he says. "That was really hard for me."

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Shots - Health News
2:54 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Could Your Child's Picky Eating Be A Sign Of Depression?

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 4:23 pm

One of the frequent trials of parenthood is dealing with a picky eater. About 20 percent of children ages 2 to 6 have such a narrow idea of what they want to eat that it can make mealtime a battleground.

A study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics shows that, in extreme cases, picky eating can be associated with deeper trouble, such as depression or social anxiety.

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Goats and Soda
2:42 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of pingpong.
Courtesy of Andela

Originally published on Tue August 4, 2015 5:55 am

The continent of Africa has long been seen as the place where humanitarian aid and World Bank loans go — to attempt to save lives or to dictate how countries should grow.

Now there's a new movement underway — a technology movement. Young entrepreneurs from the continent are protesting the old ways by launching startups that, they say, will put Africans in the driver's seat. But not everyone agrees that technology is the solution to Africa's problems.

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The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

New York Attorney General Orders Immediate Halt To Realistic Toy Gun Sales

It is illegal to sell toy guns in New York that look real.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 3:57 pm

Toy guns that look real should no longer be sold in New York.

NPR's Joel Rose reports that retailers who were selling realistic-looking toy guns have agreed to halt their sales of the product. Wal-Mart, Amazon and other retailers have also agreed to pay $300,000 in fines as part of a settlement announced Monday.

An investigation by the New York attorney general's office found more than 6,000 toy guns that violate New York law were sold in the state in the past three years.

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Mon August 3, 2015

California Wildfire Blazes Through 60,000 Acres, Containment Estimated Next Week

The "Rocky Fire" isn't expected to be contained until Aug. 10.
Josh Edelson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 3:39 pm

As wildfires continue to blaze across California, one fire is more expansive in its reach than others. It's called Rocky Fire, and it began last week. It has already burned through at least 60,000 acres.

The Rocky Fire, one of numerous active wildfires in the state, is north of San Francisco, and member station KQED reports it is roughly double the size of the city.

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