-Arizona Centennial
5:30 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Marine color guard honors Arizona's Centennial

Members of Flagstaff's Marine Color Guard, from left, Pat Carr, Johnny Anaya, and John H. Yazzie, honor Arizona's 100th birthday at the Pioneer Museum in Flagstaff, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2012.
Shelley Smithson

Snow hung on pine branches as Flagstaff’s Marine Color Guard honored Arizona’s centennial this morning at the Pioneer Museum.

Locals visited the museum throughout the day where a new Centennial exhibit is on display.

The exhibit is a preview of a larger exhibit planned for the spring.

It will showcase each decade of Flagstaff’s history.

Sixty eight-year-old color guard member Johnny Anaya was born and raised in Flagstaff.

He says his favorite memories are of the Flagstaff All-Indian Powwow, which occurred every Fourth of July between 1929 and 1980.

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-Arizona Centennial
5:30 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Locals recall memories on Arizona's birthday

Joe Meehan and Les Roe rang the Emerson School bell at Flagstaff Pioneer Museum 100 times to mark Arizona's 100th birthday Tuesday.

The museum is hosting a day-long birthday party with a new Centennial exhibit by NAU history students.

Meehan, curator of Arizona Historical Society’s Pioneer Museum, says in 1912, Flagstaff was a booming frontier town with a population around 2,000.

“The lumber yard was up and running. It was growing, the university was here, the observatory was here,” he says.

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The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Pro Basketball's First Asian-American Player Looks At Lin, And Applauds

Wat Misaka dribbles the ball in a gym at the University of Utah, where he helped the Utes win the NIT in 1947. The victory drew the attention of the New York Knicks, who chose him in the draft.
The Misaka Family

Linsanity is buzzing through the sports world, as New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin has come off the bench to emerge as a star. The unlikely story of an NBA player of Taiwanese descent who attended Harvard — and who, at 6 feet 3 inches, outscored Kobe Bryant to beat the Lakers — has won him many admirers.

There aren't many players like Lin. But in Utah, there's a man who knows something about what he's experiencing. Like Lin, Wat (for Wataru) Misaka is an Asian-American who became an unlikely star and played basketball for the Knicks. But he did it in the 1940s.

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The Salt
3:51 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Why California Almonds Need North Dakota Flowers (And A Few Billion Bees)

Almond trees rely on bees to pollinate during their brief bloom for a few weeks in February.
Winfried Rothermel APN

Originally published on Wed February 15, 2012 10:27 am

This is one of those stories that reminds us that everything really is connected to everything else.

Here's the web of connections: a threat to California's booming almond business; hard times for honeybees in North Dakota; and high corn prices.

Confused?

OK, let's start with the almonds. They come from an old-world tree that migrated to California and prospered in the hands of farmers like James McFarlane, who lives right outside the city of Clovis.

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Space
3:48 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

New Telescope To Make 10-Year Time Lapse Of Sky

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, seen in this artist's rendering, will be built on the peak of the Cerro Pachon mountain in Chile and will survey every patch of the night sky. The data the telescope will collect will allow researchers to "answer fundamentally different questions about the universe," says one astronomer.
Todd Mason LSST Corp.

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:30 pm

Every 10 years, about two dozen of this country's top astronomers and astrophysicists get together under the auspices of the National Research Council and make a wish list. The list has on it the new telescopes these astronomers would most like to see built. At the last gathering, they said, in essence, "We most want the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope."

Here's why. A synoptic survey is a comprehensive map of every square inch of the night sky. The Large Synoptic Survey — LSST — will do that multiple times.

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It's All Politics
3:43 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

The TV Battle in Mich.: Santorum's True Conservative Vs. Romney's Native Son

Originally published on Wed February 15, 2012 1:28 pm

Both Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney have new ads up in Michigan as they try to shape their images for voters with the state's primary approaching in two weeks.

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Food
3:24 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Corn Prices Making Life Difficult For N.D. Bees

The northern plains, especially the Dakotas, are home to about half of the country's honey bee hives during the summer. It's been a good place for bees because they can gather nectar and pollen from so many wildflowers. But the landscape of the area is becoming less bee-friendly, and the consequences could be felt as far away as the almond groves of California, which depend on those same bees for pollination.

Shots - Health Blog
3:09 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Got A Sinus Infection? Antibiotics Probably Won't Help

Go ahead and blow, but resist the antibiotics for a typical sinus infection.
iStockphoto.com

If you've ever had a painful sinus infection, all you want is relief — fast!

So off to the doctor you go, and, as often as not, you get a prescription for an antibiotic.

Three days later, you start to feel a little better. "Thank goodness for amoxicillin!" you might say. Well, probably not quite like that, unless you're a nerdy health blogger, but you'd be saying something nice about getting a prescription from your doctor.

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Asia
3:08 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

A Primer On China's Military

Melissa Block speaks with Eric Heginbotham — senior political scientist at RAND — about China's military capability today, how it's developed over time and what the Chinese make of ramped-up attention from the US.

Middle East
2:56 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Egyptians Harbor Suspicions About U.S. Aid Groups

An Egyptian soldier on an armored vehicle guards an exchange office in Cairo on Monday. Tensions between the U.S. and Egypt are rising over Cairo's investigation of aid workers, many of them American. An Egyptian Cabinet minister, Faiza Aboul Naga, recently accused the U.S. of directly funding pro-democracy groups in order to create chaos in Egypt.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 4:16 pm

The Egyptian government has further escalated tensions with Washington by accusing U.S. officials of directly funding nonprofit groups to create chaos in the Arab country.

The latest comments were made by an Egyptian Cabinet member to prosecutors conducting a criminal probe into the activities of 43 aid workers, many of them American.

Such claims anger U.S. officials, who have threatened to hold back more than $1 billion in military aid if the crackdown on private, pro-democracy organizations doesn't end.

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