NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Giant Pumpkin, But Forget About Pie

Some pumpkins just aren't meant for the pie pan. Robert Sabin has been growing "Atlantic giant" pumpkins for ten years and says they are more like children than fruit to him. He raises his pumpkins for competition--the heavier, the better.

News
9:37 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Have The Crackdowns On Immigration Gone Too Far?

Protesters march outside the Alabama Capitol during a demonstration against the state's immigration law in Montgomery, Ala., on Nov. 15.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 2:29 pm

The architect of Arizona's controversial immigration law has been voted out of office. That law and similar statutes are undergoing difficult court challenges. And the strictest law, in Alabama, has ignited a withering backlash expected to force major changes.

Have the crackdowns on illegal immigration finally gone too far?

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Milo Miles is Fresh Air's world-music and American-roots music critic. He is a former music editor of The Boston Phoenix.

Miles is a contributing writer for Rolling Stone magazine, and he also writes about music for The Village Voice and The New York Times.

Music Interviews
9:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Jay-Z 'Decoded:' The Fresh Air Interview

This interview was originally broadcast on November 16, 2010. Decoded is now available in paperback.

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Music Reviews
9:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Iron Butterfly Stretches Its Wings On 'Fillmore East'

Iron Butterfly circa 1970.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Before Led Zeppelin, there was Iron Butterfly — these days, a very misremembered band from Los Angeles. Maybe it was the movie industry all around, but '60s garage-rock in L.A. had an expansive, almost cinematic streak. Iron Butterfly was not the most inventive band on that scene, but it became the most famous because of a single, durable, out-of-nowhere hit, "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida." The song was 17 minutes long, and the proper thing to do on underground radio stations was the play the whole thing.

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The Salt
6:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Relax, Folks. It Really Is Honey After All

When is filtered honey really honey? The answer may lie in the politics of imported food.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 6:03 am

Maybe we're too inclined to believe the worst about supermarket food.

How else to explain the reaction to a recent report about honey on the web site Food Safety News? Food Safety News is published by a lawyer who represents plaintiffs in lawsuits against food manufacturers and processors.

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Latin America
5:17 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Brace Yourself: The World Could End In 2012

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 5:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History dismisses claims that the apocalypse is coming, but it's still scrupulously providing evidence. Some people predict catastrophe in 2012, supposedly based on forecasts by the ancient people known as Mayans. Anthropologists now say there are two, not just one, ancient references to December 2012. But they say modern forecasters of doom have still, quote, "twisted the Mayan cosmovision." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Sports
5:08 am
Fri November 25, 2011

World's Worst Soccer Team Finally Wins A Game

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer. The world's worst soccer team finally won a game. In 17 years of international play, American Samoa has scored just a dozen goals, compared to the 229 they've allowed. But they scored two this week, to beat Tonga 2-1 in a World Cup qualifying match.

The American Samoans hope their win will raise their ranking. They currently sit at 204th in the world.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Business
2:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Thai Floods Disrupt Computer Hard Drive Supply

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 3:37 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's Business News starts with rising computer prices. A component used to make computers has become more expensive. The reason why, is around the world in Southeast Asia. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Afghanistan
2:00 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Afghan Reporters Maneuver Media Minefields

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:55 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In Afghanistan, a media boom followed the ouster of the Taliban in 2001, but there have been problems. Watchdog groups report hundreds of cases of violence and intimidation against journalists, including murder. Afghan reporters have learned which topics are off-limits, and they take great care to avoid offending the country's powerful. NPR's Ahmad Shafi reports from Kabul.

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