Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

Former LAPD Chief Predicts The Future Of Policing

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 3:17 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Bill Bratton is the former chief of police in Los Angeles, as well as Boston and New York. He helped introduced the system of predictive policing, and calls it the next era of crime prevention, and an evolution of community policing. Chief Bratton's now chairman of Kroll, a risk consulting company, and he joins us on the phone this morning. Thanks very much for being with us, chief.

BILL BRATTON: It's good to be with you, as always.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

Back From Iraq, A Soldier Gives Thanks With Family

Originally published on Tue December 6, 2011 7:48 am

Military families across the country celebrated Thanksgiving this week with loved ones who were home after being deployed to Iraq for the last time. Scores of troops are coming home as the war winds down to an end next month, but for one Kentucky National Guardsman, his commitment to family is as strong as his desire to serve. Brenna Angel of member station WUKY in Lexington has his story.

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Politics
6:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

After Supercommittee Fails, Last Year's Plan Gets New Look

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Sports
6:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

Deal Reached; NBA Season Mostly Saved

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 3:17 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Middle East
6:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

Mubarak's Party Haunts Egyptian Elections

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Protesters across Egypt are demanding an end to military rule and they say they no longer want anyone connected to former President Hosni Mubarak's regime in power. But an Egyptian high court recently gave a green light to hundreds of former members of Mr. Mubarak's outlawed ruling party to run for parliament. With elections scheduled to begin next week, critics worry that people connected to that era might have the money and connections to win. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson...

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

Down South, Surviving Christmas Trees In High Demand

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This year's Christmas Grinch may be Mother Nature. The Associated Press reports that historic droughts in Texas and Oklahoma have killed thousands of evergreen trees in those states, including trees being grown for sale at Christmas. Karen Barfield joins us now. She runs the Tinsel Time Christmas Tree Farm with her husband in New Caney, Texas.

Mrs. Barfield, thanks for being with us.

KAREN BARFIELD: You're welcome.

SIMON: What's your farm look like now after the drought?

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Business
6:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

Early Receipts Indicate A Happier Holiday Season

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 3:17 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The holiday shopping season started even earlier this year in hopes that consumers would spend more in these economic times. Macy's, Toy R Us, Target, all moved up their opening times - in some cases to Thanksgiving Day. Joining us now to talk about Black Friday is NPR correspondent Yuki Noguchi. You've been reporting the scenes in stores. What can you tell us about the volume of shopping?

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Author Interviews
4:49 am
Sat November 26, 2011

'Unconquered' Explores An Isolated Amazon Tribe

The rain forest around the Amazon River is home to some of the only surviving societies of people untouched by modern civilization.
Brent Stirton Getty Images

The 7 billion people on this planet have never been so connected. People in Shanghai can communicate instantaneously with people in Sioux City — which makes it all the more remarkable that there still exists a few thousand people in the Amazon rain forest who have never had contact with modern civilization.

In 2002, National Geographic asked journalist Scott Wallace to chronicle the trip of a 34-man team to search for the perimeters of a people known as the flecheiros — or the Arrow People.

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Hard Times: A Journey Across America
4:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

Art Therapy Nonprofit Improvises In New Economy

Mario Barela stands next to the supplies he uses for his percussion class. He teaches the fundamentals of drumming to children in a Phoenix domestic violence shelter.
Sam Sanders NPR

Part of a monthlong series

Every Monday, Mario Barela heads to a domestic violence shelter on the west side of Phoenix to teach children of abused women how to drum. Their instruments are old paint buckets. They circle up in the cafeteria of the shelter as Barela leads.

(For the safety of families residing there, NPR can't name or share the location of the unmarked shelter or disclose the names of any of the children there.)

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Around the Nation
4:00 am
Sat November 26, 2011

At LAPD, Predicting Crimes Before They Happen

A resident talks with a Los Angeles police officer after another officer was wounded during a shooting in the city in August. Under a program the LAPD is rolling out this month, computer statistics will be used to predict where a crime will occur. Officials hope that the technique will help reduce crime.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 3:17 pm

Capt. Sean Malinowski of the Los Angeles Police Department does his crime-fighting in front of a computer screen.

He's in the LAPD's Real Time Analysis and Critical Response Division, located in a new crime data and analysis center in downtown Los Angeles. Malinowski is tracking two crimes that just occurred in south Los Angeles. Patrol cars are already on the scene. He says this facility is state of the art in real-time policing. He wants the force to be the best in predicting where criminals will strike.

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