State Capitol News
1:05 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

House Approves Religious Ban on Contraception Coverage

The state House voted Thursday to let ANY employer refuse to provide contraceptive coverage based on its religious beliefs.

State laws says companies that provides prescription coverage for workers must pay for contraceptives.  There is an exception for religious employers. But that is limited to churches and certain nonprofit service affiliates. This legislation would expand that exception to any company that claimed a religious reason for refusing to fund birth control. Rep. John Kavanagh said that ban would include the "morning-after'' pill. 

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World Cafe
1:03 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

Dr. Dog On World Cafe

Dr. Dog.
Chris Crisman

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 9:22 am

The Philadelphia pop-rock band Dr. Dog has continued to get better since forming in the early 2000s. The group's seven albums of layered psychedelia are deeply influenced by the best of '60s pop, adding up to a sound that's both timeless and classic.

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The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

U.N. Panel Says Findings On Gadhafi's Death Are Incoclusive

The late Moammar Gadhafi attends the opening session of the Africa-EU summit in November 2010.
Mahmud Turkia AFP/Getty Images

A United Nations expert panel found that both sides in the conflict leading up to Moammar Gadhafi's demise in Libya last year were responsible for war crimes.

The AP reports:

"The U.N.-appointed Commission of Inquiry on Libya says in its report published Friday that "international crimes, specifically crimes against humanity and war crimes, were committed by Gadhafi forces."

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The Salt
12:43 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

American History Baked Into The Loaves Of White Bread

Aaron Bobrow-Strain is an associate professor of politics at Whitman College. He specializes in the politics of the global food system.
Greg Lehman Courtesy Beacon Press

White bread, like vanilla, is one of those foods that's become a metaphor for blandness. But it wasn't always that way.

Aaron Bobrow-Strain, professor of food politics at Whitman College, tells Weekend Edition's Rachel Martin that white bread was a deeply contentious food — ever since the early 1900s' ideas of "racial purity" up to the cultural revolution of the 1960s. He documents that cultural legacy in his new book, White Bread: A Social History of the Store-Bought Loaf.

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The Salt
12:15 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

Bloggers Replace Mom's Recipe Box As Source Of Food Knowledge

The laptop is replacing the recipe box in many American kitchens.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri March 2, 2012 12:36 pm

We're going to venture that just by nature of the fact that you're reading this blog, you count yourself as a member of the social mediarati.

If so, you, and a lot of other people, may sooner turn to Epicurious or Facebook to plan your next meal than your grandmother's recipe box or the Nestlé Toll House bag of chocolate chips in the cupboard. That's the word from the Hartman Group, a consumer research firm, and Publicis Consultants USA, a marketing agency.

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Monkey See
12:00 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

Kristin Chenoweth On God, Comedy, And Dolly Parton

Kristen Chenoweth stars in the new ABC series GCB.
Karen Neal ABC

Originally published on Sat March 3, 2012 1:00 pm

Kristin Chenoweth talks to Jacki Lyden on today's Weekends on All Things Considered, and if the only thing you got from the interview was Chenoweth warbling a bit of the first solo she ever did in church, it would be well worth it.

The Emmy-winning actress stars on ABC's new GCB, a sort of Desperate-Housewives-ish dishy, soapy comedy-drama premiering Sunday night at 10. She's come quite a long way since, as she explains, her father negotiated her first contract.

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Fri March 2, 2012

Va. Supreme Court Denies State Attorney's Request For 'Climategate' Records

FILE - In this 2011 file photo, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli gestures during a news conference in Richmond, Va.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri March 2, 2012 12:21 pm

Virginia Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli's quest to obtain records from a noted climate scientist has been halted by state's Supreme Court.

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Around the Nation
11:28 am
Fri March 2, 2012

Decoding The Allure Of The Almanac

An unusually warm winter has caused many flowers and trees to begin blooming early in the northeast.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

There's been something wacky with the weather this winter, and many forecasters never saw it coming.

Among them was the Old Farmer's Almanac, the quirky, centuries-old mix of historical data, prognostications and folk wisdom. Millions of people consult the quirky, centuries-old almanac, which uses a secret formula to come up with its annual, year-long weather forecasts, even though meteorologists say it has a dubious track record.

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Science
11:00 am
Fri March 2, 2012

Neil deGrasse Tyson On Exploring Cosmic Frontiers

In Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson writes of how space exploration--especially human voyages--can profoundly inspire scientists and technologists of the future, and charts the path for missions to Mars and beyond.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Fri March 2, 2012

'Galileo' Lives In A New Production

Originally published on Fri March 2, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Up next, an old play that's even more relevant today. An off-Broadway production of the play "Galileo" - Bertolt Brecht - just opened here in New York. It stars F. Murray Abraham in the title role. Brecht wrote the play in 1938. That's more than 70 years ago. I saw the play this week. And I'm no theater critic, but the message and the theme of the play about a Renaissance-era astronomer written by a Cold War-era playwright, it feels like it could have been written last week.

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