Around the Nation
11:43 am
Tue June 5, 2012

A Plan To Reform Immigration Policy, DIY-Style

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 1:05 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Immigration remains an intense political issue in this country and a point of contention between Mexico and the United States. In an op-ed published on Saturday in The New York Times, Jorge Castaneda, Mexico's former foreign minister, and Douglas S. Massey, founder and co-director of the Mexican Migration Project, argue that in the shadow of that gargantuan debate, time and commonsense decisions by Mexican migrants have brought us nearly everything immigration reform was supposed to achieve.

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Around the Nation
11:41 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Giant Tankers Battle Wildfires From The Sky

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 1:05 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. We're still weeks away from the hottest and driest part of the year, and fire season is already well underway: Colorado, Nevada, Utah, California, Arizona, New Mexico. In a few minutes, we'll talk with a meteorologist who tries to forecast fire conditions, and we'll focus on the pilots who swoop through smoke and turbulence to drop retardant on wildfires. Two of them died in the crash of an elderly plane in Utah on Sunday.

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The Salt
11:39 am
Tue June 5, 2012

The Storied History Of A Tunisian Tuna Pastry Called Bric

Steve Inskeep displays his "bric," a fried pastry containing runny egg and canned tuna.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 1:25 pm

Over the next couple of weeks, NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road trip across North Africa to see how the countries of the Arab Spring are remaking themselves after revolutions last year.

Steve and his team are traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo.

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NPR Story
11:28 am
Tue June 5, 2012

The Day Buddy Guy 'Left Home,' Bound For The Blues

"I didn't learn nothing from a book," Buddy Guy tells NPR's Neal Conan. "I learned by ... being quiet, keep your ears open and listen."
Paul Natkin

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:21 am

Guitar legend Buddy Guy has been called the bridge between the blues and rock 'n' roll, as well as one of the most influential blues musicians in the world. Guitar icons like Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan and countless others use words like "legend," "master" and "greatest of all time" to describe him.

In his new memoir, When I Left Home, Guy describes what he calls his second birthday: the day he left his home of Louisiana for Chicago, the blues capital of the world.

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It's All Politics
10:30 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Wisconsin Moderates: Heroes Or Heretics?

Stickers are given to voters Tuesday in Milwaukee. Wisconsin voters are choosing between Republican Gov. Scott Walker and Democratic challenger Tom Barrett in a recall election.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 1:04 pm

When Wisconsin State Sen. Dale Schultz goes to the polls Tuesday, he will vote for GOP Gov. Scott Walker in the gubernatorial recall election.

"I'm a Republican," Schultz said during an interview in his Capitol office in Madison, on the eve of the state's historically acrimonious and expensive recall election.

But if the Democratic candidate, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, succeeds in ousting Walker, Schultz, 58, says, "I'm going to do everything I can to make him successful, too."

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Shots - Health Blog
10:22 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Summertime And Healthy Kids Are Never Easy

Dr. Robert Block, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, makes his opinion about the group crystal clear on his Twitter feed.
Twitter

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 10:23 am

Join us today at 3:30 p.m. EDT for a chat on Twitter with pediatrician Robert Block, the current president of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Search for the hashtag #nprkids. We'll be tweeting from @NPRHealth with @DrBobBlock for about a half-hour.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Tue June 5, 2012

California's Prop 8 Same-Sex Marriage Ban Looks Headed To Supreme Court

A federal appeals court in San Francisco says it will not reconsider an earlier ruling that California's Prop 8 ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional.

That means, as our colleagues at KQED's News Fix blog report, that "Prop 8 supporters will almost certainly ask the United States Supreme Court to hear the case."

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Disney To Put Limits On Food Ads In Bid To Nudge Kids To Eat Healthier

Mickey thinks kids should eat better.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 4:53 pm

With an endorsement from first lady Michelle Obama for its effort, Walt Disney Co. confirmed this morning that it is going to apply new standards to food ads aimed at children and their families during programming for kids. The entertainment giant says it will try "to inspire kids to lead healthier lifestyles."

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The Two-Way
9:49 am
Tue June 5, 2012

How The Transit Of Venus Helped Unlock The Universe

The planet Venus is seen crossing the sun in June 2004 as photographed through a telescope at Planetarium Urania in Hove, Belgium. The earliest known observation of such a transit was in 1639 by English astronomer Jeremiah Horrocks.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 6:46 am

In an age when the size of the observable universe is known to a few decimal places, today's Transit of Venus offers a good opportunity to reflect on just how far we've come.

(For viewing information, click here.)

Less than 250 years ago, the brightest minds of the Enlightenment were stumped over how far the Earth is from the sun. The transits of the 1760s helped answer that question, providing a virtual yardstick for the universe.

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Music Reviews
9:40 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Tracing The Evolution Of Lost Chicago Jazz

Mike Reed's People, Places and Things.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 12:29 pm

Drummer Mike Reed put together his quartet People, Places and Things to play music by their 1950s forebears. But it makes sense that, after a few years together, they'd also play later pieces, tracking the evolution of Chicago jazz on a new album titled Clean on the Corner. One dividend of their repertory work is that it inspires Reed to write his own tunes in the same spirit, like "The Lady Has a Bomb."

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