Politics
3:28 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Revisiting Conventions Of Elections Past

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 7:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Political conventions used to be dramatic events that made history. They nominated candidates for president. They debated crucial issues under glaring lights. Now, not so much. Presidential candidates win or lose nominations in primaries, and parties tend to see - and use - conventions as what amounts to advertisements for themselves. Our apologies to Norman Mailer.

Read more
Politics
3:28 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Ahead Of Conventions, Candidates Hone Message

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 7:16 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Republicans and Democrats will talk a lot about the economy during their national conventions over the next couple of weeks. And yet, the man who is about to be nominated by the Republican convention, Mitt Romney, briefly strayed from an economic message yesterday, while speaking in the Detroit suburb of Commerce, Michigan.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:28 am
Sat August 25, 2012

For A Craftsman, Shining Shoes Offers Ties To Home

Marsha, who uses a 20-step shining process, promises that all of his customers will leave feeling like they have brand new shoes.
Tanner Latham for NPR

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 10:29 am

Charlotte-Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, N.C., is one of the busiest in the world. On a typical day, more than 100,000 people traverse its concourses.

Some of those travelers stop for a shoeshine. And if they look for one on Concourse D, they will find Getnet Marsha, a shoeshiner with an Ethiopian accent, a soul patch and an interesting story to tell.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:07 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Veteran N.C. Political Strategists See Obama Path To Winning Tar Heel State

President Obama walks onto the stage before speaking at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill on April 24.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 7:20 am

If you want to understand how the White House race will play out in North Carolina as we enter the convention phase, talking to Carter Wrenn, a Republican, and Gary Pearce, a Democrat, is a good start.

The two veteran political strategists have, over decades, been involved in many a Tar Heel campaign.

One of Wrenn's best known clients was Jesse Helms, the late North Carolina senator renowned for both his surliness and race baiting.

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:00 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Apple's Patent Win Could Alter Landscape Of Smartphone Industry

Banners advertising Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S III and Apple's iPhone 4S are displayed at a store in Seoul, South Korea.
Ahn Young-joon AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 1:35 pm

The dust has yet to settle on Apple's patent lawsuit victory Friday over electronics rival Samsung. Samsung has said it will ask the court to overturn the verdict, which would award Apple more than $1 billion in damages. But if that's unsuccessful, Samsung will likely appeal.

Read more
NPR Story
2:47 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Hurricane Andrew: Florida's Unwelcome Visitor

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 7:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
2:47 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Need A Soprano? Get A Gibbon On Helium

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 7:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This just in: Gibbons on helium sing like sopranos. Wired magazine reports on a study at Kyoto University in which an ape named Fuku-chan was placed in a chamber filled with helium enriched air. This was not a party trick. Helium-rich air apparently allows scientists to more easily analyze vocalizations. Fuku-chan's bellow went from this:

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLOWING)

SIMON: To this:

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLOWING)

Read more
NPR Story
2:47 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Apple Win Over Samsung Sends Message To Industry

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 7:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Apple has won a decisive victory in a closely watched patent lawsuit. A federal jury in California yesterday ordered Samsung to pay Apple slightly more than $1 billion. The jury found that the world's largest maker of smartphones had essentially stolen iPhone and iPad technology. As NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, the impact of the ruling is likely to be felt throughout the tech industry.

Read more
Politics
2:47 am
Sat August 25, 2012

Romney Reboot? Convention Could Be The Ticket

Riggers load nets full of balloons for the Republican National Convention festivities inside the Tampa Bay Times Forum on Friday in Tampa, Fla.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Mitt Romney, 65, has spent the better part of a decade running for president. And as the son of a Michigan governor who headed a Detroit auto company, he's been in the public eye much longer.

Yet the former Massachusetts governor has remained an enigma to many voters, his political positions malleable, and much of his business and private life — including his Mormon religion — intentionally obscured.

Or simply declared off limits, like years of his tax returns.

Read more
Music Interviews
11:03 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Sean Rowe: An Outdoorsman Enters Civilization

Sean Rowe's new album is The Salesman and the Shark.
Marius Bugge

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 7:16 am

Sean Rowe has a voice and a style that stands out in popular music. His voice is deep — really, truly deep — fine, and often doleful. He's a baritone troubadour who sings of roads not taken, regrets and the dreams that shake you awake at 3 in the morning.

After years of working bars, road houses and more bars, Rowe is playing concert stages and winning over critics for his story-songs and that remarkable voice. But, as he tells NPR's Scott Simon, he wasn't always so proud to be a singer.

Read more

Pages