News

Justin Clifton

Canyon Lands National Park in southern Utah is a preserve for countless archaeological and cultural artifacts. It also sits atop highly sought after oil deposits. That dichotomy is the focus of a new documentary by Flagstaff filmmaker Justin Clifton. Our Canyon Lands explores the history and current challenges of land management near the park. Thursday night is the Flagstaff premiere of Clifton's film. He spoke with Arizona Public Radio's Aaron Granillo about the documentary.

12 News

An Arizona state lawmaker says the U.S. Forest Service has agreed not to immediately remove and possibly auction up to 100 wild horses from the Tonto National Forest along the Salt River northeast of Phoenix.

Rachel Leingang/Arizona Capitol Times

  The Arizona Court of Appeals has declined an expedited review of a judge's dismissal of Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas' lawsuit against the state Board of Education.

Douglas attorney Stephen Tully said Tuesday that means she will have to file a normal appeal once Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Patricia Starr issues a final order in the case.

Courtesy

When presidents approach the end of a term, an otherwise little-known federal law often hits the headlines. It’s the Antiquities Act, passed by Congress in 1906.

USDA Forest Service Active Fire Mapping Program

The U.S. Forest Service now has a better view of wildfires from space, thanks to a new agreement with NASA.

The agreement gives wildland fire managers access to data from a satellite imaging system called VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite). In the daytime, VIIRS can theoretically detect a flaming fire just 50 square meters—about the size of a small house. At night, VIIRS can detect a fire five times smaller. That’s an improvement on current technology, called MODIS, which routinely detects wildfires about 1,000 square meters in size.

National Park Service

Hundreds of years ago, indigenous Puebloan women sculpted clay pots and used them to collect water. When commentator Scott Thybony found a potsherd near Wupatki National Monument, it transported him back in time and inspired this month's Canyon Commentary.

Myrabella

Some environmental and public-health groups are applauding President Obama’s Clean Power Plan designed to cut carbon dioxide emissions from U-S power plants. But some Arizona politicians say it’ll have a negative economic impact on the state. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Charlie Leight/The Republic

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey plans to ask the federal government to approve major changes to the state's Medicaid insurance plan designed to encourage recipients to better utilize services and possibly cut state costs.

The plan to be formally announced Monday applies to able-bodied adults who don't provide care for small children, about a quarter of the state's 1.7 million Medicaid recipients. They would be charged co-pays for some services and required to pay 2 percent of their income into a health savings account.

Farmers in central Arizona are working together to protect a precious resource that flows through their land. The Verde River supplies every drop of water they use for irrigation, and everything else in their lives. As the drought swallows up lakes and rivers across the West, Verde Valley farmers are embracing new and old technology to ensure their water supply doesn’t dry up. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports.

Melissa Sevigny

Pronghorn antelope are native to the American West. But the landscape they roam is increasingly fraught with peril. Highways and railroad tracks block their movement and make it difficult for pronghorn to find food, water and mates. Even simple cattle fences act as barriers. Now, wildlife biologists and volunteers have created a program to help pronghorn cross those boundaries.  

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