News

Arizona Republic

A recent study by the U.S. Geological survey has found high levels of Mercury and Selenium in fish and other food sources along the Colorado River in Glen Canyon and Grand Canyon National Park. Arizona Public Radio’s Justin Regan reports.

A petition submitted today by a nonprofit environmental group seeks to trigger federal reform of uranium mining regulations on public lands.

The petition focuses on so-called “zombie” mines that have been reopened after long periods of inactivity. It asks for limits on how long a mine can remain on standby, as well as new environmental reviews when an old mine reopens. It also proposes regular inspections of inactive mines, long-term water monitoring and firm deadlines for reclamation.  

AZ Central

Gov. Doug Ducey wants able-bodied Arizonans on the state's Medicaid program for the poor to pay into health savings accounts and be charged co-pays for some services. But those proposals and others he's touting got a tough reception at the first meeting where the public was allowed to weigh in.

Maricopa County officials are urging residents to take measures in the wake of two mosquito-borne disease outbreaks.

The Coloradoan

A group supporting the legalization of recreational marijuana in Arizona says its proposed ballot initiative could pump millions dollars into state education every year. 

NOAA's Climate Prediction Center released it's monthly discussion on the most recent status of the building El Niño. What makes this news is that this is officially now a "strong event."

Genetics are thought to play a significant role in why some pinyon pines survive drought, and some don't. But a biologist at Northern Arizona University believes a newly discovered fungus is making the real difference between life and death.

thedrinkingbirdblog.com/

Two environmental groups have filed objections to a forest-thinning project designed to protect Flagstaff’s watershed from wildfire and flooding. The groups say the plan would have negative effects on the threatened Mexican spotted owl. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 

Two people in Coconino County are recovering from a rare disease called tularemia, or rabbit fever.

These are the first confirmed cases of tularemia in Coconino County in a decade. The bacterial infection mainly affects mammals, especially rabbits and hares. It can spread to humans who have handled infected animals or been bitten by deer flies or ticks.

EPA/Reuters

The U.S. Interior Department will lead a review of the Colorado mine spill that tainted rivers in three western states.

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