Biology http://knau.org en Brain Food: Mysterious Skunks of the High Country http://knau.org/post/brain-food-mysterious-skunks-high-country <p>Mild winters make skunks more active. Instead of resting and preserving their energy, they venture out of their dens and hunt for food. Tad Theimer is a vertebrate biologist and associate professor at Northern Arizona University.</p><p> Thu, 03 Apr 2014 11:58:00 +0000 Bonnie Stevens 45488 at http://knau.org Brain Food: Mysterious Skunks of the High Country Brain Food: Valentine's Day In The Natural World http://knau.org/post/brain-food-valentines-day-natural-world <p>As we get ready to celebrate Valentine's Day, Northern Arizona University ecology professor Nancy Collins Johnson reminds us that we can learn a lot about relationships from nature. Collins is a soils expert who studies mycorrhizal symbiosis - or, healthy relationships between fungi and the roots of plants.</p><p> Thu, 13 Feb 2014 12:15:00 +0000 Bonnie Stevens 43372 at http://knau.org Brain Food: Valentine's Day In The Natural World Brain Food: Spring-Loaded Muscles http://knau.org/post/brain-food-spring-loaded-muscles <p>A Northern Arizona University regents’ biology professor is studying how the speed with which frogs catch insects can improve the mechanics of artificial limbs for humans. Kiisa Nishikawa has discovered the connection is a protein called titin. It essentially enables muscles to “think,” reacting in milliseconds, rather than waiting for a signal from the brain.</p><p> Thu, 16 Jan 2014 16:34:43 +0000 Bonnie Stevens 42239 at http://knau.org Brain Food: Spring-Loaded Muscles Brain Food: Growing Human Skin http://knau.org/post/brain-food-growing-human-skin <p>Step into Robert Kellar's physiology and anatomy class at NAU and you'll learn how the human body works. But, step into his lab an you'll learn how to grow human skin. Dr. Kellar can teach plants how to manufacture human protein.</p><p> Thu, 05 Dec 2013 18:01:04 +0000 Bonnie Stevens 40589 at http://knau.org Brain Food: Growing Human Skin Brain Food: The One Gene Difference http://knau.org/post/brain-food-one-gene-difference <p>Some scientists predict the Southwest will continue on its warming trend. NAU biology professor Tom Whitham says the rise in temperatures is happening so fast - 3 degrees in the last 60 years - that many plants are not able to adapt and survive.</p><p> Thu, 14 Nov 2013 12:09:00 +0000 Bonnie Stevens 39693 at http://knau.org Brain Food: The One Gene Difference Brain Food: It's A Microbial World Afterall http://knau.org/post/brain-food-its-microbial-world-afterall <p>Bacteria make up most of life on Earth. It's life we can't see. Some bacteria thrive in such extreme environments as the boiling water of the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park, or in the driest place on Earth - the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. But, according to Greg Caporaso in the Center of Microbial Genetics and Genomics at NAU, the most extreme environment for life is inside the human body.</p><p> Thu, 07 Nov 2013 15:16:44 +0000 Bonnie Stevens 39426 at http://knau.org Brain Food: It's A Microbial World Afterall Brain Food: Insights And Discoveries From The Campus Of Northern Arizona University http://knau.org/post/brain-food-insights-and-discoveries-campus-northern-arizona-university <p>Slogging through the thick, sticky mud of a pond in Sedona, wildlife biologist Carol Chambers is catching bats in nets stretched across the water.</p><p> Thu, 31 Oct 2013 14:16:50 +0000 Bonnie Stevens 39117 at http://knau.org Brain Food: Insights And Discoveries From The Campus Of Northern Arizona University